• Edit

    The East

    The east side of the city is often considered the heart of Sacrosanct. It's here were the majority of the shopping district can be found, deep in the heart of downtown. It's here that magic thrives, it hums in every stone and can be felt in every breath. Often times, new comers to the city may be come overwhelmed by such sensations but, eventually, it becomes an ever present feeling that's hardly noticed. The streets of the east side are frequented by all species as many companies are housed in the sky scrapers and hole in the wall establishments that line the streets.

    What's You'll Find Here

  • Edit

    Downtown

    Downtown

    The city has a unique skyline, clashing between modern sky rises and small victorian storefronts. In the heart of downtown, the sleek colored glass buildings reign supreme though their old-world roots can be seen in the most peculiar places from the lamp post styled electric street light to the stone sidewalks. The old world architecture slowly returns the further from downtown you travel, however.

  • Edit

    Inner Sanctum

    owned by Alexander Macedonia
    3 employees

    Inner Sanctum

    This hidden little cafe is loaded with essentricities and antiques that fill every corner of this remarkable place. The walls are lined with oddities from every corner of the world. Beyond the intriging decor, this place is known for it's delectable coffees and it's exquisite latte art.

    Owner Alexander Macedonia

    Barista Alexis Wilde
    Assistant Manager Calliel Alosi
    Barista Beylani Rose

  • Edit

    Red on the Water

    owned by Isolt Griffin
    2 employees

    Red on the Water

    Nestled in a pleasant alcove that is but a stone?s throw away from the dazzling labyrinth of downtown, Red on the Water is a spectacle in its own right. Renovated in the style of a classic Irish pub with a dash of modern flare befitting the city that boasts it, this up-and-coming venue is the perfect place to snag an impeccably prepared home-cooked meal and enjoy the city?s most impressive collection of brews from Ireland and beyond. You and your guests are sure to be mesmerized and invigorated by the energetic offerings of the live Celtic band to be found here every weekend.

    Owner Isolt Griffin

    Co-Owner Damon Marcello
    Waitress Yumi Chizue

  • Edit

    The Bakery

    owned by Taliah Vieira
    2 employees

    The Bakery

    The Bakery is a small bakery that serves anything that your heart desires, from sweet to savory this little place has it all. The area overall is small and cozy, a seating area that lines the windows and several bakery cases that provide freshly baked goods every day. The Bakery also takes special orders and delivers to local cafes.

    Owner Taliah Vieira

    Baker Sterling Tenembrage
    Baker Ludovino Donati

And maybe we are two sinners (Kite)72.174.74.6Posted On December 14, 2017 at 5:35 PM by Lisé Dupont

and maybe we are two sinners
who go bigger, but burn quicker

“Stupid James,” Lisé huffed as she peered into the coffee cup before her, revealing a reflection of a very hungover woman. She had to tag along while James dealt with his “business” in the nearby area. Smelling the latte gently waft to her nostrils made her stomach churn. Rather than avoiding more acidity, she took a small sip, desiring more to be awake than to feel well. Glancing around her, it was a nice and cozy café. She mostly appreciated the dim lighting and quiet customers clacking away on their laptops, concentrated on their own tasks at hand. She was curled up in the back corner of the café, finding it was the darkest and most silent part of the building. She quickly surveyed the area, making sure no one could see her take her small flask out of her purse and put a dash of whiskey in the coffee.

After many instances of hangovers Lisé became a pro at surviving the next day. Who knew that more alcohol would be the solution though? As she sipped on her warm drink some more, she found a bookshelf close by her. When was the last time I even read? she asked herself, trying to recall the last novel but nothing came to mind. Stumbling upon a book of poetry, she skimmed through the pages, chuckling out loud at how ridiculous she thought the writer was. What was the point of being vague in a poem? Why couldn’t people just say outright how they felt? she hated having to decipher text to reveal a meaning behind something. It was just like modern art. For her, she found it to be idiotic. She remembered when her parents forced her to take art classes, along with poetry reciting, piano lessons, the whole nine yards. If it was considered an aristocratic sport or activity, she was forced to participate. They would expect nothing less than the best. Perhaps that’s why she was so out of control now. How she got shit faced every night, slept with any person she could find, and found she had zero empathy for any living being. Why should she care? It was the only way she could take control of her own life. She knew she still wasn’t free from criticism and independence when it came to decision making.

Continuing to ponder her past, she added a few sugar cubes to her coffee, now staring into the mirrored liquid swirling about. Her life had changed drastically since she met James. What a nightmare he was. Like an annoying little brother that you had to have in your sight always. Although, she found that she quite literally could not live without him. She was sure he felt the same about her. Still, he could have taken care of this business on his own without her having to step out of the mansion. “Dick,” she muttered slurping the last drip of the latte and clanking her glass down on the wooden table. She checked her watch with frustration, it had been two hours. How long do I have to wait? Seriously James? I guess I might as well order another coffee while I’m waiting. Not like I can go anywhere else she thought. Standing up she left her mug at the table, so someone wouldn’t take it and went to the counter contemplating on what she should get this time.

Lisé Etta Dupont;
dante



Replies